The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown : A young girl buys an antique box at a yard sale, unaware that inside the collectible lives a malicious ancient spirit. The girl’s father teams with his ex-wife to find a way to end the curse upon their child.

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

Released on the Labor Day weekend,

The Possession ( 2012 )

Release Date: Wed, 29 Aug 2012

Director

Ole Bornedal (born 26 May 1959) is a Danish film director, actor and producer. Bornedal was born in Nrresundby, Denmark. He wrote and directed Nattevagten (Nightwatch, 1994), a thriller about a law student who works in a morgue as a night-watchman, and becomes implicated in a series of murders of prostitutes. He also directed an English language remake (Nightwatch) in 1997, st…

Released on the Labor Day weekend, Ole Bornedal’s The Possession is a film that surprised many at the ticket office, taking in more than $21 million. The supernatural thriller, about a haunted Dybbuk box, features 150 visual effects shots from Artifex Studios, helping add to the film’s scares. We talk to VFX supe Adam Stern about the work.

Here is the website for the Artifex studios : http://www.artifexstudios.com/

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

Artifex Studios
Founded Year: 1997

Artifex Studios is an award-winning visual effects studio based in Vancouver BC. Recent film projects include

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

The Possession Movie CGI VFX Breakdown

To keep the curse of the real-life Dibbuk Box at bay, Ole Bornedal, director of the movie ‘The Possession’ available in theaters on August 31, decided to recreate a box for the movie that would hopefully protect cast and crew. Like the actual container that was auctioned on Ebay in the real life story, the film’s box needed to be ordinary enough not to arouse immediate suspicion, but mysterious enough that it could, in Bornedal’s words, “symbolize the evil we all hope to keep trapped forever.”

Explains producer J.R. Young: “It was less important for us to recreate the actual box as to create a box you believe might contain something that was locked away to never be let out in the world. Rachel O’Toole [production designer] came up with some great concepts, and we also went back to the original story for the contents, including the bird skeleton, the locks of hair and the strange wooden carvings.”

For the demon itself, the production turned to makeup special effects designer Bill Terezakis. “How do you give face to a demon? What is the face of evil?” asks Young. “Bill and Ole came up with a design that would embody this. Their vision was to ask not how much can we show, but how little can we show to completely shock you?”

Without giving anything away, Terezakis notes: “Ole wanted something that would feel very ancient and I think we delivered on that.”

Adds visual effects supervisor Adam Stern: “We really wanted to create something that was not only scary but also grounded in reality as much as possible.”

For producer Robert Tapert, that hope of creating something that lingers in the imagination, that continues to make your heart pound long after the final images, was the driving force behind the entire creative process on ‘The Possession’.

He concludes: “We want audiences to leave the theater with the feeling that, since the horror you just witnessed is based in fact, it could come calling for you. The idea of the Dibbuk Box is something we think will scare audiences not just in the theater, but after they leave.”

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